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Ceylon Chai
Chai InfusedOur Chai ingredientsCeylon Chai
ITEM NO. SLCH-01.

Ceylon Chai

SRI LANKA | CENTRAL PROVINCE| NUWARA ELIYA

SRI LANKA | CENTRAL PROVINCE| NUWARA ELIYA

Our first chai blend and it’s sure to not be our last. We’ve combined our favourite spices – cinnamon, cardamom pods, star anise, cloves, ginger and black peppercorns – with a full flavoured Ceylon to give you an authentic chai experience.
 

Processing
Leaves are picked after the first monsoon and are then processed in cooler weather using the orthodox method; fully oxidised.

Elevation
1,200 metres

Learn more
Quantity

Our first chai blend and it’s sure to not be our last. We’ve combined our favourite spices – cinnamon, cardamom pods, star anise, cloves, ginger and black peppercorns – with a full flavoured Ceylon to give you an authentic chai experience.
 

Processing
Leaves are picked after the first monsoon and are then processed in cooler weather using the orthodox method; fully oxidised.

Elevation
1,200 metres

The traditional spices are balanced with the honey, walnut, wood and undertones of citrus fruit and cocoa in the Ceylon and take you away to the subtropical “Spice Island” of Sri Lanka.

 

The soothing, pleasant flavours and aromas have a warming effect that make you feel good inside. This black tea blend is best served hot on a cold fall day and can be paired with bakedgoods such as cinnamon scrolls, banana walnut bread and oatmeal raisin cookies. For an iced chai in the summer, see the preparation method for tips.

Western

2 tsp. per 250 mls (1 cup)

First infusion: 21/2 – 3 mins @ 95 oC

Second infusion: 3 – 4 mins @ 95 oC

 

If you are accustomed to drinking chai with milk and honey, consider following the preparation method for a chai latte.

 

Chai Latte

Today chai is popular worldwide and each country – even each region within a country – has its own recipe. The spices vary, the tea varies and even how chai is prepared varies. Some boil tea, spices and milk together, while others briefly steep the tea leaves and spices in hot water, then add hot milk and sweetener last. And in western India they add 1 tsp of black tea after the rest of the ingredients have boiled. The pot is removed from the heat, covered, and allowed to infuse for 10 minutes.

 

We’ve made it easy for you by creating our Ceylon Chai that has the best ingredients together already.

 

All you have to do is:

1. Measure 4 tsp of Ceylon Chai with 11/2 cups of water into a pot and bring to a boil

2. Allow the tea to simmer for 5 minutes

3. Add one cup of soy, almond or cow’s milk and heat for 2 minutes

4. Taste and allow to simmer for longer (if necessary) until you achieve the desired flavour

5. Strain, add 1 tsp of honey and stir until completely dissolved.

 

Iced Chai

Enjoy an iced chai on a hot day by following these simple steps:

1. Infuse 18 tsps of Ceylon Chai in 11/2 litres of 100 oC water for 20 minutes

2. Add honey or sugar (to taste) until completely dissolved

3. Strain and store the concentrate in the fridge until cold

4. Combine 1/3 to 1/2 cup chai concentrate with 1 cup of milk (almond or soy is our preference)

5. Serve in a clear glass with star anise set in ice cubes and sprinkle lightly with ground cinnamon

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Learn about the origin and terroir of this tea.

We personally blend our chai from a blend of six spices and a single estate, medium grown Ceylon from Kenilworth Tea Estate. Tea production methods in Sri Lanka do not require the use of the chemical methyl bromide, which is known to deplete the ozone layer; therefore, all Ceylon has the reputation of being one of the most ecologically and environmentally friendly teas. Some of the best teas come from the Central Province in Sri Lanka.

 

The plants thrive in the moderate climate (22 – 25 oC) of the highlands and when the rainfall comes it quickly runs off the slopes so the soil is well drained. How Ceylon is processed helps determine its final character. After withering and rolling, the leaves are spread out again in a cool, damp environment to encourage enzymatic reactions by exposing them to oxygen.
 

By fully oxidising the leaves the tea develops its signature malty, citrus, sweet and nutty flavours.